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World's Best Advice for your Common Cold!

178. Neti Pots – Good or Bad for colds?

The Risks and Benefits of Neti Pot Nasal Irrigation

See Peggy’s journalistic test of a Neti Pot

Though nasal irrigation with salt water has been found to an effective and inexpensive treatment option for sinusitis symptom relief, neti pot use may increase the risk of recurrence. A new study reveals why and what we can do about it.

A Cochrane Analysis –Yay some intelligence invested in this issue! –– shows that in studies of the Neti Pots, they can be helpful AND harmful for common colds.

An online discussion of the Neti Pots shows the controversy, that for people who have long term irritation of your nasal passages, especially due t the common cold virus, the rinsing of them with warm salt (saline) water can be good or bad

GOOD

It does seem to relieve symptoms, because, like the function of mucous, it is rinsing and flushing out the cold viruses that are multiplying.

No discussion of the temperature of the water in this article. WHY ARE THEY MISSING THE MOST IMPORTANT ELEMENT? (answer because they are not making money from it)

but a scary article from National Public Radio NPR News in December 2011 warns about risk of “brain eating amoeba” if using contaminated tap water, which in this case was tap water from the warm waters of the southern state of Louisiana and pushing it up your nose.

“Second Neti-Pot Death From Amoeba Prompts Tap-Water Warning”

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2011/12/19/143960631/second-neti-pot-death-from-amoeba-prompts-tap-water-warning?sc=fb&cc=fp

The amoebas had already caused deaths in Children who were swimming in this kind of water had also died from the same “brain eating amoeba” since they probably did cannonballs that caused the water to be pushed up into their nose, whereas adults had outgrown that kind of behavior.

Then two adults had the same cause of death, and the second death triggered an idea to see if the victims had used Neti Pots

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2011/12/19/143960631/second-neti-pot-death-from-amoeba-prompts-tap-water-warning?sc=fb&cc=fp

So if you use only sterilized water, and carefully clean and dry it inbetween uses.

Some other medications were also suggested by other commenters, but do we REALLY want to explore all the possible chemicals and medicines we can use to fight off common cold virus in our noses, when there is already such a simple remedy?

Warm & Steamy!!!

this whole Neti Pot nettle controversy shows, in contrast how simple and safe our Warm & Steamy advice is….and come to think of it, steam is BOILED water that is therefore already sterilized, so no risk of contamination.

The simplicity of my remedy, in contrast, is striking, Non invasive. Clean, free, easy, accessible.

Some commenters discussed other pump sprays, and I’e also heard of using a cotton swab such as a Q-tip, expecially for a baby’s stuffy nose, dipped in warm salt water.

Sounds fine. But lets try the simplest, safest solutions first, shall we?

For your healthy, happy life,

Peggy The Doctor’s Wife

Tags:

Are your Telomeres too short?

Check your telomeres in the mirror.

This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.  Telomer-structure, used with permission with Attribution: Iridos at the English language Wikipedia

Telomer-structure, used with permission
(c) Iridos at the English language Wikipedia

Are they too short?

 

Bet you didn’t even know you had them, but turns out they do show, when you get a runny nose. Or at least, your shorter ones show in that you probably get more colds than people who have longer ones.

Big news last month on the common cold was the discovery by researchers that a part of your DNA, the cap of your Chromosone called a “telomere” could determine your body’s susceptibility to the common cold.

And if so, what can you do about it? Is there a clinic where you can get them fixed? Can a personal trainer assist you in working out to lengthen and strengthen them?

Sadly no.  So what good does it do us to know about this? Well, none at the moment, but perhaps in future this can assist medical researchers to figure out how to work around that sadly deficient telomere and help people resist colds more.

Foundational knowledge, it is. But cool to think about it. The wikipedia entry has a neato 3-dimensional video clip of a multicolor telomere structure diagram.

According to Science 2.0 One of the researchers, a professor of psychology at Carnegie Mellon University explains

“Our work suggests the possibility that telomere length is a relatively consistent marker across the life span and that it can start predicting disease susceptibility in young adulthood… We knew that people in their late 50s and older with shorter telomeres are at a greater risk for illness and mortality.

“We expected that younger people would vary in their telomere length as well and wanted to see what this would mean for their health.

“Those with shorter telomeres in the CD8CD28- cell population may be at greater risk for infection because they have fewer functional cells available to respond to the [cold] virus. The superior ability of CD8CD28- T-cytolytic cells to predict infection gives us an idea of which cells to focus on in future work on how telomere length influences the immune system’s response to infection and other immune-related challenges.”

…Cohen emphasized that “this is preliminary research and further work with other viruses and with natural infections will help clarify its implications.”

All of which tells ME that… hmmmm…. really, what??? Just that ANY incremental, small news that is real solid information about the common cold is so basic to our health, if any small improvement can be made on the common cold for humanity, that it becomes HUGE international news.

Now … how to get the BIG  little news  out about “Warm & Steamy?”

127. Repost part 2 “Speech from Common Cold Convention

CONTINUED FROM PART 1

Over-The-Counter common cold remedies

do they really work to get rid of your cold? Or are they just very expensive placebos?

 

Repost from www.ThoughtCatalogue.com

(NOTE from Peggy The Doctor’s Wife: this is a fictional humor essay, but I appreciate its critique of the ethics of the hugely profitable, yet ineffective, cold remedy market for the pharmaceutical industry

Third, our beloved lobbyists. We appreciate you continuing to dispel rumors that a cure for the common cold was invented in 1952. It was not. And if we occasionally come up with a cure for the common cold, please know that it’s simply because we ran out of marketing ideas.

Lastly — and relatively new members to our brethren, who are quickly attaining a reputation as earners — I’d like to acknowledge the creators of the magic elixirs, who have convinced people they can stave off the common cold with vitamin C powders, magic bracelets and even magnetic toe rings. Stand and take a bow. I speak for this entire auditorium when I say we are truly looking forward to your line of tattoo cures in 2013.

I know we’re all excited to get to the happy hour and toast our good fortune, but I’d like to reminisce for a moment. I don’t mean to get sentimental — we all know the danger of contracting conjunctivitis from public crying. But whenever I see people sharing a ChapStick, or an obviously non-monogamous couple kissing in public, or someone ordering a draught beer in a seedy bar — it brings a tear to my eye, not to mention a ka-ching to my soul, because I know the state of the common cold is strong.

Okay, enough dripping eye and nasal secretions all over each other. Queue up the PowerPoint. And because this convention is flush with cash, I present to you at a ridiculous cost the one, the only, Beastie Boys.  [cue music band ]