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World's Best Advice for your Common Cold!

Cider Remedy for Cold and Flu with hidden Warm & Steamy ingredient

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See if you can find the hidden ingredient that I recommend in this  recipe for an apple cider remedy for colds! Kind of like Where’s Waldo, let’s call it “Where’s the Warm & Steamy?”

Probably the only important ingredient in the recipe that actually affects your cold virus.

But the other ingredients  are so strong that they may just overpower your suffering. Do they really kill off the virus?  It’s possible they may help some by just revving up your mucous production with their walloping strong flavors, and therefore help stimulate your immune system to flush out the virus.

Or perhaps they numb your throat sensations with their burn-off-your-taste-buds recipe (only things missing are Serrano hot peppers and turpentine!). Even if it doesn’t cure your cold you can use it in a zingy chow mein recipe, for sure!

reposted from Care2 internet site which has a mélange of socially concerned sites. This one in the “Healthy living category”

Peggy The Doctor’s Wife


<< by Annie B. Bond June 27, 2004

Here is a great natural formula—with a spicy, zesty, delicious flavor#—that offers relief from cold and flu symptoms, and is an effective natural antibiotic.

Several healing ingredients make this tasty formula one that you can drink at the first sign of a cold or flu to help open up your sinuses and bronchial passages. You can also gargle with it for relief from sore throats. We plan to print this out and keep it handy all fall and winter long; when the sniffles hit, this will help! Here’s the recipe:

INGREDIENTS (Try to use organic if at all possible)

25 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons dried or 3 tablespoons fresh Echinacea root, grated or chopped
1/3 cup fresh horseradish root, grated
1/4 cup fresh gingerroot, peeled and sliced
1 large white onion, diced
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper powder
Honey to sweeten, if desired
Raw apple cider vinegar, 1 quart or less

1. Place all dry ingredients in a 1-quart wide mouth jar. Fill to the top with vinegar. Cover the top of the jar with plastic wrap, then screw on the lid.

2. Refrigerate for six weeks so the flavor can develop and soften. Shake daily. There’s no need to strain and bottle it unless you want to. The flavor keeps getting better and bolder the longer the formula is allowed to steep.

3. At the first sign of a cold or flu, take 2 tablespoons of this formula with a warm water chaser. Rinse mouth out well after swallowing the cider. Repeat once or twice daily for the duration of the illness. You should feel your sinus and bronchial passages quickly open and your breathing become easier.

4. For a sore throat, gargle with the formula for 60 seconds, spit, then rinse out your mouth. You should feel immediate relief.

Makes about 1 quart.


Read more:
http://www.care2.com/greenliving/zesty-cider-cold-and-flu-formula.html#ixzz2O8t5ZSD7

127. Repost part 2 “Speech from Common Cold Convention

CONTINUED FROM PART 1

Over-The-Counter common cold remedies

do they really work to get rid of your cold? Or are they just very expensive placebos?

 

Repost from www.ThoughtCatalogue.com

(NOTE from Peggy The Doctor’s Wife: this is a fictional humor essay, but I appreciate its critique of the ethics of the hugely profitable, yet ineffective, cold remedy market for the pharmaceutical industry

Third, our beloved lobbyists. We appreciate you continuing to dispel rumors that a cure for the common cold was invented in 1952. It was not. And if we occasionally come up with a cure for the common cold, please know that it’s simply because we ran out of marketing ideas.

Lastly — and relatively new members to our brethren, who are quickly attaining a reputation as earners — I’d like to acknowledge the creators of the magic elixirs, who have convinced people they can stave off the common cold with vitamin C powders, magic bracelets and even magnetic toe rings. Stand and take a bow. I speak for this entire auditorium when I say we are truly looking forward to your line of tattoo cures in 2013.

I know we’re all excited to get to the happy hour and toast our good fortune, but I’d like to reminisce for a moment. I don’t mean to get sentimental — we all know the danger of contracting conjunctivitis from public crying. But whenever I see people sharing a ChapStick, or an obviously non-monogamous couple kissing in public, or someone ordering a draught beer in a seedy bar — it brings a tear to my eye, not to mention a ka-ching to my soul, because I know the state of the common cold is strong.

Okay, enough dripping eye and nasal secretions all over each other. Queue up the PowerPoint. And because this convention is flush with cash, I present to you at a ridiculous cost the one, the only, Beastie Boys.  [cue music band ]

100. REPOST: What is the “Norovirus?”

Aha! It is a basic stomach bug. 

 

REPOST from eHow.com

Norovirus

By Misty Barton, eHow Contributor

The norovirus is the most common cause of upset stomach in the United Kingdom. In 2010, it caused mass outbreaks among passengers on cruise ships.

  1. Symptoms

    • The most common symptoms of the virus are nausea, diarrhea and vomiting. In some cases, fever, headaches and general cramping may also occur.

    Occurrence

    • The United Kingdom’s national health service estimates that up to 1 million citizens in the U.K. contract the norovirus annually. The Center for Disease Control reports 21 million cases annually in the United States.

    • Sponsored Links

    Transmission

    • Norovirus is mainly spread through fecal-oral transmission. This means that human waste infected with the virus must enter the system orally to cause infection. There is also strong evidence that suggests that the virus can be transmitted via airborne vomit that is swallowed or contaminates other surfaces.

    Treatment

    • There is no effective treatment to cure norovirus; the disease must run its course. Treatment combats the dehydration caused by vomiting and diarrhea. In most cases, electrolytes are given orally, but in extreme cases, intravenous fluid replacement may become necessary.

Read more: Norovirus | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/facts_7467462_norovirus.html#ixzz2FI9sQEeU

 

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