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World's Best Advice for your Common Cold!

178. Neti Pots – Good or Bad for colds?

The Risks and Benefits of Neti Pot Nasal Irrigation

See Peggy’s journalistic test of a Neti Pot

Though nasal irrigation with salt water has been found to an effective and inexpensive treatment option for sinusitis symptom relief, neti pot use may increase the risk of recurrence. A new study reveals why and what we can do about it.

A Cochrane Analysis –Yay some intelligence invested in this issue! –– shows that in studies of the Neti Pots, they can be helpful AND harmful for common colds.

An online discussion of the Neti Pots shows the controversy, that for people who have long term irritation of your nasal passages, especially due t the common cold virus, the rinsing of them with warm salt (saline) water can be good or bad

GOOD

It does seem to relieve symptoms, because, like the function of mucous, it is rinsing and flushing out the cold viruses that are multiplying.

No discussion of the temperature of the water in this article. WHY ARE THEY MISSING THE MOST IMPORTANT ELEMENT? (answer because they are not making money from it)

but a scary article from National Public Radio NPR News in December 2011 warns about risk of “brain eating amoeba” if using contaminated tap water, which in this case was tap water from the warm waters of the southern state of Louisiana and pushing it up your nose.

“Second Neti-Pot Death From Amoeba Prompts Tap-Water Warning”

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2011/12/19/143960631/second-neti-pot-death-from-amoeba-prompts-tap-water-warning?sc=fb&cc=fp

The amoebas had already caused deaths in Children who were swimming in this kind of water had also died from the same “brain eating amoeba” since they probably did cannonballs that caused the water to be pushed up into their nose, whereas adults had outgrown that kind of behavior.

Then two adults had the same cause of death, and the second death triggered an idea to see if the victims had used Neti Pots

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2011/12/19/143960631/second-neti-pot-death-from-amoeba-prompts-tap-water-warning?sc=fb&cc=fp

So if you use only sterilized water, and carefully clean and dry it inbetween uses.

Some other medications were also suggested by other commenters, but do we REALLY want to explore all the possible chemicals and medicines we can use to fight off common cold virus in our noses, when there is already such a simple remedy?

Warm & Steamy!!!

this whole Neti Pot nettle controversy shows, in contrast how simple and safe our Warm & Steamy advice is….and come to think of it, steam is BOILED water that is therefore already sterilized, so no risk of contamination.

The simplicity of my remedy, in contrast, is striking, Non invasive. Clean, free, easy, accessible.

Some commenters discussed other pump sprays, and I’e also heard of using a cotton swab such as a Q-tip, expecially for a baby’s stuffy nose, dipped in warm salt water.

Sounds fine. But lets try the simplest, safest solutions first, shall we?

For your healthy, happy life,

Peggy The Doctor’s Wife

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95. REPOST Feeling ill: Common cold or common core? (part 2of 2)

CONTINUED from part 1

Feeling ill: Common cold or common core?(part 2)

common cold suffering causes teacher to ponder that other problems in life catch on like viruses…so question all the authoritative instructions to see what evidence they are based on (same for cold remedies!)

Understanding the outbreak: Standards vs. initiatives

First, separate the symptoms from the cause. This is true of cold viruses, we all present symptoms differently. The same holds true for the standards.

Let me define this virus for a moment. It is not the standards themselves. Just as a cold virus is not cold weather, though related. Common Corefluenza is the deluge of “the standards DEFINITELY say you MUST teach like this” and “these modules are EXACTLY how you MUST organize your instruction” and nearly anything with the term “EXEMPLAR.”…..

…..(discussion of education standards issue)

Home remedies

I am quite literally writing this with a humidifier running, rapidly cooling ginger tea, a pile of cough drops and, yes, Kleenex shoved in my nose. We are all friends here.Often times the best ways to fix what ails you begin at home. The same holds true for helping yourself deal with making sense out of all of the options swirling around.

…… (more discussion of education standards issue)

4) Be innovative and reflective. None of this should be read as suggesting that we fight to keep things the same for the sake of keeping them the same, just as we shouldn’t change everything just because it sounds like a good idea. We do have a long way to go to educating every child, and that road is paved with thoughtfulness and reflection. Take the CCSS as an invitation to experiment with new approaches and be certain your criteria for success is not if you met someone’s expectation for an initiative, but if it led your students to new thinking and more developed independent practice.

Wash your hands regularly: Don’t spread germs

Cover your mouth when you cough. Wash your hands regularly with soap and water. If a questionable “MUST” initiative doesn’t sound right, don’t spread it around.

Christopher Lehman is an author, a speaker and a senior staff developer at the Teachers College Reading & Writing Project at Columbia University. His latest book, “Energize Research Reading and Writing,” is now available. He can be found on his blog and on Twitter @iChrisLehman.

93. Textbook on Evidence Based Medicine

Here’s a Medical Textbook giving us an outline of the issues of Evidence based Medicine versus all the alternatives…of which the Common Cold is at the forefront of the battleground between— waging a war over our personal health with millions of lives and billions of $$$ at stake.

One of the textbook authors is Paul Glasziou, Professor of Evidence-Based Medicine, University of Oxford, UK.!

Impressive that there is a whole field of “Evidence Based Medicine” in which he can be a specialist!

Elsevier is a leading publisher of health science books and journals, helping to advance medicine by delivering superior education, reference information and decision support tools to doctors, nurses, health practitioners and students. With titles available across a variety of media—print, online and handheld, we are able to supply the information you need in the most convenient format.

©2012, Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Evidence-Based Medicine

Evidence-Based Medicine

Textbook on Evidence-BAsed Medicine

4th Edition How to Practice and Teach it

By Sharon E. Straus, MD, Associate Professor, Department of Medicine, University of Calgary and University of Toronto;

Paul Glasziou, MRCGP, FRACGP, PhD, Professor of Evidence-Based Medicine, University of Oxford, UK;

W. Scott Richardson, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, South Texas Veterans Health Care Systems and University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, TX and

R. Brian Haynes, MD, Attending Physician, Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation, Hamiton, Ontario; Chief, Health Information Research Unit, McMaster University, Ontario, Canada’

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

Asking answerable clinical questions

Acquiring the evidence: How to find current best evidence and have current best evidence find us

Appraising the evidence

Therapy

Diagnosis and screening

Prognosis

Harm

Evaluation

Teaching EBM

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I’m looking forward to learning more!