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World's Best Advice for your Common Cold!

127. Repost part 2 “Speech from Common Cold Convention

CONTINUED FROM PART 1

Over-The-Counter common cold remedies

do they really work to get rid of your cold? Or are they just very expensive placebos?

 

Repost from www.ThoughtCatalogue.com

(NOTE from Peggy The Doctor’s Wife: this is a fictional humor essay, but I appreciate its critique of the ethics of the hugely profitable, yet ineffective, cold remedy market for the pharmaceutical industry

Third, our beloved lobbyists. We appreciate you continuing to dispel rumors that a cure for the common cold was invented in 1952. It was not. And if we occasionally come up with a cure for the common cold, please know that it’s simply because we ran out of marketing ideas.

Lastly — and relatively new members to our brethren, who are quickly attaining a reputation as earners — I’d like to acknowledge the creators of the magic elixirs, who have convinced people they can stave off the common cold with vitamin C powders, magic bracelets and even magnetic toe rings. Stand and take a bow. I speak for this entire auditorium when I say we are truly looking forward to your line of tattoo cures in 2013.

I know we’re all excited to get to the happy hour and toast our good fortune, but I’d like to reminisce for a moment. I don’t mean to get sentimental — we all know the danger of contracting conjunctivitis from public crying. But whenever I see people sharing a ChapStick, or an obviously non-monogamous couple kissing in public, or someone ordering a draught beer in a seedy bar — it brings a tear to my eye, not to mention a ka-ching to my soul, because I know the state of the common cold is strong.

Okay, enough dripping eye and nasal secretions all over each other. Queue up the PowerPoint. And because this convention is flush with cash, I present to you at a ridiculous cost the one, the only, Beastie Boys.  [cue music band ]

86. 17 Tricks for Cold care continued

Continued from Post 85.

These two tips sound OK to me. Best to use disposable towels if you have a lot of mucous. But even better would be hot air dryers. Since the virus lives in the moisture.

I especially like the Chicken soup one (just made turkey soup myself.)

I don’t, however, swallow the “integrative medicine” (ie. not evidence based but based on Chinese folk philosophy)  explanation, below, of its healthfulness being due to the Chinese “Yin” factor. 

The obvious reason chicken soup works is not due to a mysterious ingredient, but that it is hot & steamy!  Also healthy food with protein and vegetables so lots of good nutrition, and very tasty and soul satisfying.

==========================================

disposable towels are best

 

1.Dry Your Hands on Paper (Not Cloth) Towels

 

What you dry your hands with is just as important as washing them, says Jamie Oskin, N.D. a naturopathic physician. Reusing the same cloth towel can spread even more germs. “Paper towels can be easily disposed of to prevent the spreading of germs.” It may seem un-green to use paper towels, but Dr. Oskin points out that for the amount of times a sick person washes her hands, it can be more of a burden on the environment to keeping washing those cloth towels.

 

 

Use Soup Bones

Chicken soup is hot & steamy as well as healthy soul satisfying nutrition

 

We always wondered why chicken soup was so good for colds, and it seems that the chicken bones could hold at least a part of the answer. “Depending on your diet, try and incorporate bone marrow into your soups and stews by adding organic, free-range bones into the broth,” recommends Elizabeth Trattner, A.P, D.O.M, an integrative medicine specialist in Miami Beach, FL. “Marrow is the root of blood and yin in Chinese Medicine and keeps the body healthy and strong during the winter season,” she says. Bone marrow contains a type of fat found in our organs (in small amounts), which encourages the body to produce white blood cells to protect against infections and disease, explains Trattner.

 

NEXT Trick:  Elderberry Syrup

80. American College of Emergency Physician Guide to Cold and Flu (part 2)

Continued from Part 1: REPOST OF ACEP COLD AND FLU ADVICE, part 2

By American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP)

WASHINGTON, Dec. 3, 2012 — The Nation’s Emergency Physicians Want You To Know The Difference Between Them and What You Can Do To Stay Healthy
Read more here:

Is it the flu or a cold? How to tell the difference?

Flu:

Seasonal influenza, which is commonly known as “the flu” may affect between 5 to as high as 20 percent of the U.S. population depending on the year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  More than 200,000 people are hospitalized each year for flu-related complications and about 36,000 people die each year from the flu.

Older people, young children, pregnant women and those with certain chronic health conditions are at higher risk.  It spreads from person to person by direct contact or through virus-infected droplets coughed or sneezed in the air.  The best way to protect against the flu is to get vaccinated every year.  The ideal time for that is usually before flu season begins — which typically peaks in January and will last through about March.

Signs and symptoms of the flu may include:

  • High fever (usually 100 degrees F to 103 degrees F in adults and often higher in children)
  • Chills
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle Aches
  • Dizziness
  • Loss of appetite
  • Dry cough
  • Sore throat
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Weakness
  • Ear Infection
  • Diarrhea

Call your primary care doctor or go to the nearest emergency department if you feel it’s necessary and if symptoms are severe or worsen.

Both the common cold and flu are caused by viruses, and therefore do not respond to antibiotics.  Flu symptoms usually are more severe than the typical sneezing, stuffiness and congestion that go along with a cold.  Flu symptoms also tend to develop quickly — typically between one and four days after a person is exposed to the flu virus, and people are contagious from 24 hours before they become ill until their symptoms resolve.

CONTINUED IN PART 3