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World's Best Advice for your Common Cold!

Should you use complementary medicine? risk/benefit

Lots of alternative treatments for colds abound (they all say they work!)

(from webMD.com article)

Should you use complementary medicine?

cupping is form of acupuncture

cupping is another form of Chinese treatment related to acupuncture, causing round bruises on your skin. Does it work?

 

Before you decide to use this type of treatment, think about these questions:

  • Why are you considering this treatment? People often use complementary medicine to treat long-term health problems or to stay healthy. But if you are looking for a “cure-all,” you may be disappointed. Before you begin to use it, make sure that you learn how well it is likely to work.
  • What are you comfortable with? Part of the philosophy of some forms of complementary medicine is to listen to and touch people in a healing way. Some people find great comfort in this. Others may be bothered by it.

Many complementary treatments are covered by insurance plans. But check to see what your plan covers.

What are the risks?

The greatest risk is that you may use these treatments instead of going to your regular doctor. Complementary medicine should be in addition to treatment from your doctor. Otherwise you may miss important treatment that could save your life.

Sometimes complementary medicines can be dangerous when they are combined with another medicine you are taking. Always talk to your doctor before you use any new medicines. Diet supplements, for example, are complementary. And they can vary widely in how strong they are and in how they react to other medicines.

Also, complementary medicine isn’t controlled as much as standard medicine. This means you could become a victim of fraud. Sellers or people who practice complementary medicine are more likely to be frauds if they:

  • Require large up-front payments.
  • Promise quick results or miracle cures.
  • Warn you not to trust your doctor.

What are the benefits?

One benefit is that many people who practice complementary medicine take a “whole person,” or holistic, approach to treatment. They may take an hour or more to ask you questions about your lifestyle, habits, and background. This makes many people feel better about the treatment, the person giving the treatment itself, and the condition.

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